Lesson:  Miss Mary Mack -  Grade: 1

by Debbie Grenier

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 Open Power Point Show on Miss Mary Mack

 

Day 1

 Goals: 

·        To reinforce the concept that oral language can be represented by written language

·        To reinforce the format and conventions of written language

·        To strengthen students’ knowledge of the alphabetic principle

·        To increase students’ level of understanding through predictions

 Objectives:

Students will:

·        ELA 1:1

o       Determine the pronunciations and meanings of words by using phonics (matching letters and combinations of letters with sounds) and pictures.

·        ELA 1:2

o       Understand and use the format and conventions of written language to help them read texts (for example, left to right).

·        ELA 1:8

o       Make and confirm simple predictions to increase their level of understanding.

·        ELA 3:1

o       Understand the characteristic sounds and rhythms of the English language including letter-sound relationships, rhythm, and rhyme.

·        ELA 3:2

o       Speak clearly and expressively, using appropriate articulation, pronunciation, volume, rate, and intonation.

·        ELA 3:4

o       Listen effectively to spoken and audio-visual messages including stories, factual presentations, and directions.

 

Standards Addressed:

·        NH Curriculum Standard 1:  Students will demonstrate the interest and ability to read age-appropriate materials fluently, with understanding and appreciation.

·        NH Curriculum Standard 3:  Students will demonstrate the interest and ability to speak purposefully and articulately, as well as listen and view attentively and critically. 

 

Prior Knowledge:  Students should have some understanding of the format and conventions of written language.  Students should have some knowledge of the alphabetic principle.

Materials:  

·        Miss Mary Mack by Mary Ann Hoberman (big book preferable)

·        PowerPoint presentation

·        Chart paper & marker

·        Pointer

·        Paper lunch bags (one per student)

·        Black markers (one per student)

·        Cassette recorder and blank cassette

Lesson Overview:  Students will listen to Miss Mary Mack by Mary Ann Hoberman, learn the Miss Mary Mack chant, and watch their teacher write the words on a chart.

Lesson Procedures:

1.      Show the cover of Miss Mary Mack.  Ask the students to predict what the book will be about.  Ask if they’ve ever heard the “Miss Mary Mack” chant. 

2.      Read the book to the students as a read-aloud for comprehension and enjoyment.

3.      Ask students what the story was about.  Give them time to think about it before answering.

4.      Tell the students they are in for a treat.  Mrs. Grenier made a PowerPoint presentation of the “Miss Mary Mack” chant.  Show the presentation and point to the words as they come up.

5.      Write the words to the chant on chart paper while the students watch.  While you are writing, do a “think-aloud” about your spelling (modeling for them).  Write:

Miss Mary Mack, Mack, Mack,
All dressed in black, black, black,
With silver buttons, buttons, buttons,
All down her back, back, back
She asked her mother, mother, mother,
For fifty cents, cents, cents,
To see the elephant, elephant, elephant.
Jump over the fence, fence, fence.
He jumped so high, high, high,
He reached the sky, sky, sky,
And he never came back, back, back,
‘Till the end of July, ‘ly, ‘ly.

6.      Chant the words on the chart.  Ask the students to join you.  When they are in sync, tape them chanting the words at least two times.

7.      Extension: Students will color one side of a paper lunch bag with a black marker for future use.  While they are coloring, play the cassette recording of their chant.  They may sing along if they wish while they are coloring their “sacks”.  Leave bags somewhere to dry.

 

Assessment: Teacher observation during discussions & chanting.

Resources: Session 5 lesson, Whole-to-parts phonics

Learning styles addressed: This lesson plan addresses all learning styles.


Lesson:  Miss Mary Mack – Day 2

 

Goals: 

·        To reinforce the concept that oral language can be represented by written language

·        To strengthen students’ knowledge of the alphabetic principle

·        To guide students in identifying words which have similar beginning sounds

·        To help students associate words which begin with the same grapheme

Objectives:

Students will:

·        ELA 1:1

o       Determine the pronunciations and meanings of words by using phonics (matching letters and combinations of letters with sounds) and pictures.

·        ELA 1:2

o       Understand and use the format and conventions of written language to help them read texts (for example, left to right).

·        ELA 3:1

o       Understand the characteristic sounds and rhythms of the English language including letter-sound relationships, rhythm, and rhyme.

·        ELA 3:2

o       Speak clearly and expressively, using appropriate articulation, pronunciation, volume, rate, and intonation.

·        ELA 3:6

o       Listen and respond thoughtfully and respectfully to others.

Standards Addressed:

·        NH Curriculum Standard 1:  Students will demonstrate the interest and ability to read age-appropriate materials fluently, with understanding and appreciation.

·        NH Curriculum Standard 3:  Students will demonstrate the interest and ability to speak purposefully and articulately, as well as listen and view attentively and critically. 

 

Prior Knowledge: Students should have some understanding of the format and conventions of written language.  Students should have some knowledge of the alphabetic principle.  Students should be familiar with the Language Experience Approach (LEA) and be able to interact comfortably with the teacher. 

Materials:  

·        Chart paper (with words to “Miss Mary Mack” written on it from yesterday)

·        Cassette player, cassette with yesterday’s chant on it

·        White board and markers (black & yellow)

·        Paper bags from yesterday’s lesson and black markers (one for each student)

Lesson Overview:  Teacher and students engage in a whole-to-part phonics lesson.

Lesson Procedures: 

1.      Activate prior knowledge: Discuss yesterday’s lesson.  Play the cassette tape.

2.      Teacher stands in front of chart and reads the words as she points.

3.      Teacher selects a student to be the “pointer” and asks the rest of the class to “read” the words as the student points to them. Teacher observes.

4.      Ask the students, “Why do you think you were able to do that?”

5.      Allow students some thinking time.  Choose a student to answer.  The answer you want is, “Because we had the words right there and (student’s name) was pointing at them.”  This observation makes the oral/written connection.

6.      After a student provides this answer, say, “That’s right, (student’s name)!  You had the words right in front of you.  Every word in the chant is right here.  That’s really important to remember, isn’t it?  Every word we say can be written down.  Now, let’s think about some of those words.  What was one of your favorite words in this chant?”

7.      Go to the white board and allow thinking time.  Select students and write their favorite words on the board. 

8.      Guide the students to investigate the words by directing them to look at the beginnings of the words on the chart.  Take a yellow marker and color over the first letter of “Miss”, so it stands out from the rest of the word.

9.      Ask the students to say the word slowly and listen to the sound at the beginning of the words.  Ask them if there are any other words in the chant that have the same beginning sound?

10.  Select a student that has his hand up.  If he chooses another “m” word, give him the yellow marker and ask him to color the first letter like you did.  “Are there any more words in here that start with the same sound?”  Continue selecting students and having them come up and color the first letter of the “m” words.  Ask, “What letter is this?”

11.  Remind the students that everything they say can be put in writing. 

12.  Continue this with other words that have the same beginning sounds (i.e.; buttons, back, black). 

13.  Tell the students that they did a lot of work today.  They found lots of words that sounded the same at the beginning and they talked about what letters these words began with.

14.  Ask, “If these sets of words sounded alike at the beginning AND started with the same letter, could we make a rule that might help us as we work on more words this year?” (Words that begin with the same sound often begin with the same letter).

15.  Extension: Finish coloring the paper bag from yesterday.  Play cassette tape during coloring.

 

Assessment: Teacher observation during discussions

 

Resources: Session 5 lesson, Whole-to-parts phonics

 

Learning styles addressed: This lesson plan addresses all learning styles.


Lesson:  Miss Mary Mack – Day 3

 

Goals: 

·        To reinforce the concept that oral language can be represented by written language

·        To strengthen students’ knowledge of the alphabetic principle

·        Students will read for pleasure

·        Students will reread to develop a more complete understanding of the text

 Objectives:

Students will:

·        ELA 1:1

o       Determine the pronunciations and meanings of words by using phonics (matching letters and combinations of letters with sounds) and pictures.

·        ELA 1:2

o       Understand and use the format and conventions of written language to help them read texts (for example, left to right).

·        ELA 1:3

o       Identify a specific purpose for reading such as learning, locating information, or enjoyment.

·        ELA 1:5

o       Reread to confirm their initial understanding of a text and to extend their initial impressions, developing a more complete understanding and interpretation of the text.

·        ELA 1:11

o       Demonstrate the ability and interest to read independently for learning, information, communication, and pleasure.

·        ELA 3:1

o       Understand the characteristic sounds and rhythms of the English language including letter-sound relationships, rhythm, and rhyme.

·        ELA 3:2

o       Speak clearly and expressively, using appropriate articulation, pronunciation, volume, rate, and intonation.

·        ELA 3:6

o       Listen and respond thoughtfully and respectfully to others.

 Standards Addressed:

·        NH Curriculum Standard 1:  Students will demonstrate the interest and ability to read age-appropriate materials fluently, with understanding and appreciation.

·        NH Curriculum Standard 3:  Students will demonstrate the interest and ability to speak purposefully and articulately, as well as listen and view attentively and critically. 

 

Prior Knowledge:  Students should have some understanding of the format and conventions of written language.  Students should have some knowledge of the alphabetic principle.  Students should be very familiar with the text and have experience one-to-one matching.

 

Materials:  

·        “Miss Mary Mack” mini-books (pre-made by teacher with words and clipart from PowerPoint presentation) – one for every two students

·        Cassette player, cassette with chant on it

·        Coloring sheets with clipart buttons of various size – one per student

·        Colored pencils, markers, and/or crayons

 

Lesson Overview: Students will pair up to partner read.  Each student will point to the words as he/she says them (one-to-one matching) while the teacher circulates and assesses.

 

Lesson Procedures:

1.      Activate prior knowledge: Discuss yesterday’s lesson.  Play the cassette tape.

2.      Place students into pairs for partner reading.  Students should be compatible in ability.  

3.      Students sit side by side with their partner.  One student reads the mini-book, pointing to the words while reading (one-to-one matching) as the other follows along.  Then they switch.

4.      Teacher circulates to assess the one-to-one matching.

5.      Each student should read the mini-book at least twice to their partner.

6.      When everyone is done, tell the students that it is time for a fun activity and they can choose their own partner for this activity.

7.      Teach the students how to clap to “Miss Mary Mack”.  The clapping pattern is:

·        Clap own hands together

·        Cross arms in front of chest

·        Clap own hands together

·        Clap hands with partner three times

8.      Repeat as desired.

9.      Extension: Students will color the clip art buttons.  Suggest they make the buttons as colorful as they wish.

 

Assessment: Teacher observation of one-to-one matching during partner reading

Resources: Whole-to-parts phonics - Moustafa

Learning styles addressed: This lesson plan addresses all learning styles.

 


 

Lesson:  Miss Mary Mack – Day 4

 

Goals: 

·        To reinforce the concept that oral language can be represented by written language

·        To practice identifying words that end with similar rhyme sounds

·        To strengthen students’ knowledge of the alphabetic principle

·        To help students associate words that end similarly with a single spelling pattern

 

Objectives:

Students will:

·        ELA 1:1

o       Determine the pronunciations and meanings of words by using phonics (matching letters and combinations of letters with sounds).

·        ELA 1:2

o       Understand and use the format and conventions of written language to help them read texts (for example, left to right).

·        ELA 1:7

o       Recognize that their knowledge and experiences affect their understanding of materials they read.

·        ELA 3:1

o       Understand the characteristic sounds and rhythms of the English language including letter-sound relationships, rhythm, and rhyme.

·        ELA 3:2

o       Speak clearly and expressively, using appropriate articulation, pronunciation, volume, rate, and intonation.

·        ELA 3:6

o       Listen and respond thoughtfully and respectfully to others.

 

Standards Addressed:

 

·        NH Curriculum Standard 1:  Students will demonstrate the interest and ability to read age-appropriate materials fluently, with understanding and appreciation.

·        NH Curriculum Standard 3:  Students will demonstrate the interest and ability to speak purposefully and articulately, as well as listen and view attentively and critically. 

 

Prior Knowledge:  Students should have some understanding of the format and conventions of written language.  Students should have some knowledge of the alphabetic principle.  Students should be familiar with the Language Experience Approach (LEA) and be able to interact comfortably with the teacher.  They should have participated in the previous lesson (day #2) in which they identified similar beginning sounds in the words “Miss, Mary, Mack, mother, buttons, back, and black” and associated the sounds with the letters “m” and “b” at the beginning of those words.

 

Materials:  

 

·        Chart paper with “Miss Mary Mack” chant prewritten on it from the lesson on day #1

·        Red marker

·        Pocket chart

·        Word cards (teacher-made with clip art from Miss Mary Mack PowerPoint presentation) – Miss, Mary, Mack, mother, buttons, back, black, (initial consonants highlighted in yellow) Mack, black, & back (-ack phonogram highlighted in red)

·        Paper bags from previous lesson

·        “Buttons” coloring paper from previous lesson

·        scissors

·        glue

·        Cassette player with cassette of “Miss Mary Mack” chant

 

Lesson Overview: Teacher and students engage in a whole-to-parts phonics lesson.  Instead of focusing on the initial sounds as in the lesson from day#2, this lesson focuses on the rhyme pattern, or phonogram -ack.

 

Lesson Procedures:

     1. Activate prior knowledge: discuss the lesson on day #2, where the

         students discovered: words that sound the same at the beginning

         usually start with the same letter.  Ask students to tell you which words

         in the chant started with the same letters.  As they name the words,

         place the corresponding cards in the pocket chart.  Put all the “m”

         cards under each other as a group.  Put all the “b” words under each

        other as a group.

2. The teacher stands beside the chart paper with “Miss Mary Mack” on

     it.  Teacher says, “Now we will be looking for something different.

     Instead of looking at the first letter of a word, we will be looking

     for a group of letters at the end of a word.  These letters are found

     inside words and the words are part of a word family.”

3. Making connections: Discuss families.  Families are made up of

    related things.  You are part of a human family.  Words are

    sometimes part of word families.

4. Teacher takes a red marker and covers over (highlights) the –ack on

    Mack.  Ask students, “What is this word?”  After the correct answer

    is given, ask, “What sound does –ack make?”  Give students some

    thinking time.

5. When a student gives the right answer, say, “That’s right, (student’s

    name), -ack says –ack (sound it out).  Mack is part of the –ack family.

    Can anyone see another word that is part of the –ack family?”  As

   children respond with the correct answers, have them highlight the

   –ack part of the words. 

6. When all the words have been highlighted, place the corresponding

     cards in the pocket chart (Mack, black, back).  Have the students say

     the words as you point at them.  “Do they sound the same?”

7. Tell the students they did a lot of work today.  Ask them to try and

     remember everything they learned.  Lead them to recall the following:

·        Words that end in the same spelling pattern have to sound the same at the end in order to rhyme.

·        They tested the rule by saying the words out loud to see if they sounded the same at the end.

·        State the generalization.  Say, “So when we find words that end with the same pattern AND they sound the same at the end, can we say that they rhyme?  Yes, we can.  That can be another rule to help us as we work with more words this year.”

8. Extension: Students will cut out the buttons they colored and glue them on the bags they made. 

 

Assessment: Teacher observation

Resources: Whole-to-parts phonics lesson plan - Moustafa

Learning styles addressed: This lesson plan addresses all learning styles.


Lesson:  Miss Mary Mack – Day 5

 

Goals: 

·        To reinforce the concept that oral language can be represented by written language

·        To strengthen students’ knowledge of the alphabetic principle

·        To practice identifying words that end similarly with a single spelling pattern by sorting

·        To practice identifying words that begin with the same grapheme by sorting

 

Objectives:

Students will:

·        ELA 1:1

o       Determine the pronunciations and meanings of words by using phonics (matching letters and combinations of letters with sounds).

·        ELA 1:2

o       Understand and use the format and conventions of written language to help them read texts (for example, left to right).

·        ELA 1:7

o       Recognize that their knowledge and experiences affect their understanding of materials they read.

·        ELA 2:15

o       Produce different forms of creative and expository writing including stories, notes, lists, poems, and reports.

·        ELA 3:1

o       Understand the characteristic sounds and rhythms of the English language including letter-sound relationships, rhythm, and rhyme.

·        ELA 3:2

o       Speak clearly and expressively, using appropriate articulation, pronunciation, volume, rate, and intonation.

·        ELA 3:6

o       Listen and respond thoughtfully and respectfully to others.

 

Standards Addressed:

 

·        NH Curriculum Standard 1:  Students will demonstrate the interest and ability to read age-appropriate materials fluently, with understanding and appreciation.

·        NH Curriculum Standard 2:  Students will demonstrate the interest and ability to write effectively for a variety of purposes and audiences.

·        NH Curriculum Standard 3:  Students will demonstrate the interest and ability to speak purposefully and articulately, as well as listen and view attentively and critically. 

 

Prior Knowledge:  Students should have some understanding of the format and conventions of written language.  Students should have some knowledge of the alphabetic principle.  Students should be familiar with the Language Experience Approach (LEA) and be able to interact comfortably with the teacher.  They should have participated in the previous lessons (2 & 4) in which they identified similar beginning sounds in the words and associated words that ended with a single spelling pattern.

 

Materials:  

·        Chart paper with “Miss Mary Mack” chant, blank page & marker

·        Pocket chart

·        Word cards (teacher-made with clip art from Miss Mary Mack PowerPoint presentation) – Miss, Mary, Mack, mother, buttons, back, black, (initial consonants highlighted in yellow) Mack, black, & back (-ack phonogram highlighted in red)

·        Extra word cards: words from –ack family, “m” words, & “b” words (see “Prior to lesson” section for more information)

·        Paper bags from previous lesson

·        Cassette player with cassette of “Miss Mary Mack” chant

·        Spelling/writing journals and pencils

·        Snack: Cracker Jack

Lesson Overview: Teacher and students engage in a continuation of the whole-to-parts phonics lessons begun earlier.  Students will sort word cards into the appropriate groups.  Teacher will assess learning.

Prior to lesson: Place 5 word cards in each child’s bag.  The words will be from the –ack word family or KNOWN “m” or “b” words.  For example:  attack, back, black, crack, Jack, knack, lack, pack, quack, rack, sack, snack, stack, tack, track, whack, boy, baby, man, etc.

Lesson Procedures:

 

     1. Activate prior knowledge: discuss the previous lessons and the

         rules the students discovered.  Read “Miss Mary Mack” as a

         whole group.  Students practice saying the chant while clapping

         with a partner.

2. The teacher stands beside the chart paper with “Miss Mary Mack” on

     it.  Teacher says, “Now we will learn a new chant, written by

     Mrs. Grenier, to the tune of Miss Mary Mack.  Teacher writes

     these words on the chart paper:

·        I have a sack, sack, sack

·        And I colored it black, black, black

·        Then I glued on buttons, buttons, buttons

·        And I gave it to Jack, Jack, Jack

·        He put some words, words, words

·        Inside my sack, sack, sack

·        That I have to sort, sort, sort

·        Before I eat my snack, snack, snack

3. Teacher passes the bags to students.  Each child takes a turn bringing

    their word cards up to the pocket chart.  Teacher explains that some

    cards could go under two categories.  Teacher encourages students

    to look at the top words in the categories: Miss, button, Black and

    “think-aloud” before placing the cards.  Teacher assesses learning as

    students place their cards.

4. Writing: Students use their spelling journals/logs to record all the

    words in the –ack word family that are in the pocket chart.  After

    writing the list, students are asked to write two rhyming sentences,

    using two –ack words.

5. Closure: Students practice Mrs. Grenier’s new chant.  Teacher

    serves the students some Cracker Jack

 

Assessment: Teacher observation of sorting, spelling logs/journals for sentences.

Resources: Whole-to-parts phonics lesson plan - Moustafa

Learning styles addressed: This lesson plan addresses all learning styles.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflection

Debbie Grenier

 

 

How does this method of lesson planning differ from what you usually use or expected planning would be like?

 

  • This method of planning helps me focus more on goals, objectives, and assessment.  Normally, I just write a blurb of what I’m going to do in a 2”X 2” block in my lesson plan book.  There’s not a lot of room, so I write in shorthand and don’t put as much thought into my lesson as I did with this lesson plan. 

 

What would you expect to see in terms of student engagement and student outcomes after teaching this lesson?  Why?

 

  • I would expect the students to be fully engaged in this lesson and I would expect my goals to be fulfilled because I have designed this lesson to be fun, fun, fun!  Children love activities that are fun.  The get very bored if everything is the same.  If there is one thing I love to see and hear, it’s one of my students coming into the classroom and saying, “What are we doing today?” with a big smile.  They are expecting to have fun.  Learning can and should be fun.

 

How does this lesson address the needs of the emergent reader?

 

  • This lesson addresses the needs of an emergent reader by grounding instruction in a meaning context and building on what the child already knows through explicit, systematic, and extensive whole-to-parts phonics instruction.

 

How does this lesson lead to independent use of phonemic awareness and phonics skills?

 

  • This lesson leads to independence through the gradual release of responsibility of the teacher.  The student becomes more independent as he gains confidence in his abilities and sees his own growth in understanding.  This happens as the student becomes less reliant on the teacher and more reliant on himself.