Five-Day Lesson Plan for Teaching Phonemic Awareness
Second Grade
by
Rosalyn H. Weathers

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This five-day lesson plan will be taught to my 2nd grade class.  It is a class of fifteen students, three white and twelve African-American.  I have nine girls and six boys.  According to our STAR report, two of these students are on KG level, three are on 1st grade level, six are on 2nd grade level, and four are on 3rd grade level.  One child goes to Resource for approximately thirty minutes a day.

 

Lesson Plan 1

 

Goals: 

2R3  The student will use knowledge of graphophonics and word analysis to read and determine the meaning of unfamiliar words.

2R3.2  Demonstrate the ability to identify beginning, middle, and ending letter/sounds in polysyllabic words.

2R3.3  Continue applying a knowledge of onsets, rimes, and word families to decode polysyllabic words.

 

Objectives:

The student will blend words with the long e sound spelled ee or ea.

The student will read and write words with ee and ea.

 

Prerequisites:

Knowledge of letter sounds

Knowledge of onsets and rhymes

Knowledge of word families

 

Materials:

Sound/Spelling Card

Phonics Library The Clean Team

Chart paper

Pre-cut leaves

Construction paper

Construction paper tree on bulletin board

Computer with internet

Vowel Puzzles

Markers

Cards with letters

 

Specific References to Course Readings:

The articles, “Phonemic Awareness Instruction”, “Everything You Wanted to Know About Phonics, but were Afraid to Ask”, “What We Know About How to Teach Phonics”, “Whole-to-Part Phonics Instruction; Building on What Children Knew to Help Them Know More” and “Alphabetics” all support the goals and instructions of this five - day lesson plan.  These articles all gave insights to the effective teaching of reading. Many of the strategies and approaches are built into my five-day lesson plan. All three styles of learning are incorporated into these lessons, auditory, kinesthetic and visual, therefore attempting to reach all children.  “Making Words lessons promote engagement because all children can be successful.” (What We Know About How to Teach Phonics, p. 100.)  These lessons are “hands-on-minds-on” activities. “Making Words includes even children with very limited literacy who enjoy manipulating the letters and making the words even if they do not get the larger words completely made until these words are made with the pocket chart letters.” (p. 101) These lessons will help children of all levels see how you can use the patterns you see in words to read and spell other words.  Also, “Whole to Part Phonics Instruction”, by Margaret Moustafa explains how you build on prior knowledge and go on.  Each one of these lessons builds on one another, therefore, transferring responsibility to the children.

 

Resources:

Houghton Mifflin Series

Phonics Library

www.eduplace.com

 


Lesson Overview:

This lesson teaches the student the long e sound blending words with ee and ea. The Clean Team will be read and used later for children to find words with ee and ea to write on pre-cut leaves for a bulletin board. 

 

Lesson Procedure:

Introduction:

The teacher will introduce the lesson by saying, “Today we are going to blend words with the long e sound.  These words are spelled with the vowel pairs ee and ea. Listen as I read the story, The Clean Team aloud.” 

 

Main Activity-The teacher will display the Sound/Spelling card eagle, say the long e sound and invite children to repeat it several times.  The teacher will say the following pairs of words and have children put “thumbs up” each time they hear a word with the same vowel sound as the word eagle:  sheet, shout; met, meal; drum, dream; seal, sell.  The teacher will write the word deep on chart paper, underline the ee spelling and help students blend the word.  For each sound, she will point to the letter(s), say the sound, and have students repeat it.  She will also model blending the word real.  Groups of children, each with a letter, will go to the front of the room and arrange themselves to spell a word with the ee or ea pattern.  They will blend the word and repeat it.

           

Each child will be given a copy of The Clean Team to find ee and ea words.  When they find a word with ee or ea, they will write it on a pre-cut leaf and add it to the tree on the bulletin board.

 

Conclusion:

The teacher will review the words that are on the bulletin board with the children.

 

Assessment:

The teacher will make sure each child correctly puts their leaves with a word with ee or ea on the tree.  Those having trouble will be worked with individually.  Others can explore www.eduplace.com or work with vowel puzzles.

 

Activities that Develop Independence:

This five-day lesson plan builds on one another.  Lesson 1 begins with direct instruction of blending.  Children, at the end of the lesson, will find words on their own that have the ee or ea pattern and add their leaf to the bulletin board.  Lesson 2 reviews ee and ea using homophones.  Children write their own riddles with homophones.  Lesson 3 allows children to guess the covered word and then work with a partner using their own words.  In Lesson 4, the child has to blend the words correctly to get across the make-believe bridge and then writes sentences on his/her own.  Finally, in Lesson 5, the child makes words according to the prompts given by the teacher, but makes the secret word with all of the letters.

 

Monitoring Student Progress:

Student observations will be done throughout the lessons.  Running records and student conferences will be ongoing.  Conference sheets will be kept for all students.

 

Modifications that Address Diverse Learners:

 

I will point to the letters, pictures, or cards and speak slowly.  Words will be repeated to help the diverse student.  A buddy system will be incorporated for the diverse learner.  Extra time will be given for the completion of assessments. 

 


Lesson Plan 2

 

Goals:

Same as Lesson 1 with the addition of:

2R3.8  Demonstrate the ability to identify synonyms, antonyms, and homophones.

 

Objectives:

The student will blend words with the long e sound spelled with ee or ea. 

The student will write homophones with ee and ea words.

The student will write riddles with homophones.

 

Prerequisites:

Knowledge of letter sounds

Know what a riddle is

 

Materials:

Teacher:

Flour Does Not Flower by Pam Scheunemann

Chart paper

Markers

Books

Computer with internet

 

Student:

Journals/pencil

Books in reading center

 

Specific References to Course Readings:

The articles, “Phonemic Awareness Instruction”, “Everything You Wanted to Know About Phonics, but were Afraid to Ask”, “What We Know About How to Teach Phonics”, “Whole-to-Part Phonics Instruction; Building on What Children Knew to Help Them Know More” and “Alphabetics” all support the goals and instructions of this five -day lesson plan.  These articles all gave insights to the effective teaching of reading. Many of the strategies and approaches are built into my five-day lesson plan. All three styles of learning are incorporated into these lessons, auditory, kinesthetic and visual, therefore attempting to reach all children.  “Making Words lessons promote engagement because all children can be successful.” (What We Know About How to Teach Phonics, p. 100.)  These lessons are “hands-on-minds-on” activities. “Making Words includes even children with very limited literacy who enjoy manipulating the letters and making the words even if they do not get the larger words completely made until these words are made with the pocket chart letters.” (p. 101) These lessons will help children of all levels see how you can use the patterns you see in words to read and spell other words.  Also, “Whole to Part Phonics Instruction”, by Margaret Moustafa explains how you build on prior knowledge and go on.  Each one of these lessons builds on one another, therefore, transferring responsibility to the children.

 

Resources:

Houghton Mifflin Series

Phonics Library

www.eduplace.com

 

Lesson Overview: 

This lesson teaches the ee and ea sound using homophones.  The read aloud, Flour Does Not Flower, by Pam Scheunemann is used.  Students will write riddles with homophones that have ee or ea. 

 

Lesson Procedure:

           

ntroduction: The teacher will read aloud the book, Flour Does Not Flower, by Pam Scheunemann.  Ask the students if any words sound the same.  Explain that homophones are words that sound the same, but are spelled differently and have different meanings.

Main Activity: Go back through the book and homophones on each page and write them on chart paper.  Discuss the meaning of each word.  Point out that some of them have the ee and ea spelling.  The teacher will model writing riddles with a pair of homophones.

Conclusion: Riddles will be reviewed as well as words with ee and ea. Students will be given the homophones, week, weak and meat, meet to write riddles in their journals.  These will be shared with the class.

 

Assessment:

Students will be monitored as they find the homophones on each page.  I would assess the riddles they wrote. Individual help will be given to those having trouble.   Students finishing early can go to www.eduplace.com or read books in the reading center.

 

Activities that Develop Independence:

This five-day lesson plan builds on one another.  Lesson 1 begins with direct instruction of blending.  Children, at the end of the lesson, will find words on their own that have the ee or ea pattern and add their leaf to the bulletin board.  Lesson 2 reviews ee and ea using homophones.  Children write their own riddles with homophones.  Lesson 3 allows children to guess the covered word and then work with a partner using their own words.  In Lesson 4, the child has to blend the words correctly to get across the make-believe bridge and then writes sentences on his/her own.  Finally, in Lesson 5, the child makes words according to the prompts given by the teacher, but makes the secret word with all of the letters.

 

Monitoring Student Progress:

Student observations will be done throughout the lessons.  Running records and student conferences will be ongoing.  Conference sheets will be kept for all students.

 

Modifications that Address Diverse Learners:

 

I will point to the letters, pictures, or cards and speak slowly.  Words will be repeated to help the diverse student.  A buddy system will be incorporated for the diverse learner.  Extra time will be given for the completion of assessments. 

 


 

Lesson Plan 3

 

Goals:

Same as Lesson Plan 1

 

Objectives:

The student will use letter sounds to guess the covered word.

The student will use problem-solving strategies to help them determine the covered word.

The student will stretch out words to guess the covered word.

 

Prerequisites:

Knowledge of letter sounds

Knowledge of syllables

 

Materials:

Teacher:

Chart paper

Paper to cover the word

Secret word

“Making words” center

Computer with internet

 

Student:

Journals/pencils

 

Specific References to Course Readings:

The articles, “Phonemic Awareness Instruction”, “Everything You Wanted to Know About Phonics, but were Afraid to Ask”, “What We Know About How to Teach Phonics”, “Whole-to-Part Phonics Instruction; Building on What Children Knew to Help Them Know More” and “Alphabetics” all support the goals and instructions of this five -day lesson plan.  These articles all gave insights to the effective teaching of reading. Many of the strategies and approaches are built into my five-day lesson plan. All three styles of learning are incorporated into these lessons, auditory, kinesthetic and visual, therefore attempting to reach all children.  “Making Words lessons promote engagement because all children can be successful.” (What We Know About How to Teach Phonics, p. 100.)  These lessons are “hands-on-minds-on” activities. “Making Words includes even children with very limited literacy who enjoy manipulating the letters and making the words even if they do not get the larger words completely made until these words are made with the pocket chart letters.” (p. 101) These lessons will help children of all levels see how you can use the patterns you see in words to read and spell other words.  Also, “Whole to Part Phonics Instruction”, by Margaret Moustafa explains how you build on prior knowledge and go on.  Each one of these lessons builds on one another, therefore, transferring responsibility to the children.

 

Resources:

Houghton Mifflin Series

Phonics Library

www.eduplace.com

 

Lesson Overview:

           

In this lesson, the students will play a game called, “Guess the Covered Word”.  Words with the spelling pattern ee and ea will be used.

 

Lesson Procedure:

           

 Introduction: The teacher will have a word written on chart paper, but it will be covered.  Explain to the students that they are going to play a game called “Guess the Covered Word’.  Tell them they will use letter sounds to help them guess the word.

Main Activity: The teacher will show the students the first letter of the word.  After the children guess, show them the next letter.  Continue this process until all the students figure out the word.  Some of the secret words to use:  teacher, treehouse, eagle, eastern, and teammate. 

Conclusion:  Review the words used in the game.

 

Assessment:

           

Students will write the covered words in their journals.  They will then think of two words that have two or more syllables to play the game with a partner.  I would circulate around the room and observe who understands the concept.  Those who do not understand will work in a small group with me.  Those finishing early can explore www.eduplace.com or go to “making words” center.

 

 Activities that Develop Independence:

This five-day lesson plan builds on one another.  Lesson 1 begins with direct instruction of blending.  Children, at the end of the lesson, will find words on their own that have the ee or ea pattern and add their leaf to the bulletin board.  Lesson 2 reviews ee and ea using homophones.  Children write their own riddles with homophones.  Lesson 3 allows children to guess the covered word and then work with a partner using their own words.  In Lesson 4, the child has to blend the words correctly to get across the make-believe bridge and then writes sentences on his/her own.  Finally, in Lesson 5, the child makes words according to the prompts given by the teacher, but makes the secret word with all of the letters.

 

Monitoring Student Progress:

Student observations will be done throughout the lessons.  Running records and student conferences will be ongoing.  Conference sheets will be kept for all students.

 

Modifications that Address Diverse Learners:

 

I will point to the letters, pictures, or cards and speak slowly.  Words will be repeated to help the diverse student.  A buddy system will be incorporated for the diverse learner.  Extra time will be given for the completion of assessments. 

 


 

Lesson Plan 4

 

Goals: 

Same as Lesson Plan 1

 

Objectives:

The student will blend words correctly to guess the password.

After listening to a story, the student will pick out words with long e or long o sounds.

 

Prerequisites:

Knowledge of letter sounds

Knowledge of onsets and rhymes

Knowledge of word families

 

Materials:

Teacher:

The Three Billy Goats Gruff

Chart paper

Markers

Make-believe bridge

Computer with internet

 

Student:

Paper/pencils/markers

 

Specific References to Course Readings:

The articles, “Phonemic Awareness Instruction”, “Everything You Wanted to Know About Phonics, but were Afraid to Ask”, “What We Know About How to Teach Phonics”, “Whole-to-Part Phonics Instruction; Building on What Children Knew to Help Them Know More” and “Alphabetics” all support the goals and instructions of this five -day lesson plan.  These articles all gave insights to the effective teaching of reading. Many of the strategies and approaches are built into my five-day lesson plan. All three styles of learning are incorporated into these lessons, auditory, kinesthetic and visual, therefore attempting to reach all children.  “Making Words lessons promote engagement because all children can be successful.” (What We Know About How to Teach Phonics, p. 100.)  These lessons are “hands-on-minds-on” activities. “Making Words includes even children with very limited literacy who enjoy manipulating the letters and making the words even if they do not get the larger words completely made until these words are made with the pocket chart letters.” (p. 101) These lessons will help children of all levels see how you can use the patterns you see in words to read and spell other words.  Also, “Whole to Part Phonics Instruction”, by Margaret Moustafa explains how you build on prior knowledge and go on.  Each one of these lessons builds on one another, therefore, transferring responsibility to the children.

 

Resources:

Houghton Mifflin Series

Phonics Library

www.riverdeep.com

 

Lesson Overview:

 

Using The Three Billy Goats Gruff, the teacher will continue to reinforce long vowel sounds.  A make-believe bridge will be set up, and the child has to blend sounds correctly to guess the password to get across the bridge.  Students will then write sentences with the passwords and illustrate them.

 

 

Lesson Procedure:

 

Introduction:  Read aloud The Three Billy Goats Gruff.  

Main Activity:  The class will pick out any long vowel ee, ea, or oa words they see, and the teacher will write them on chart paper.  The teacher will have an area set up with a make-believe bridge.  Children will line up on one side as billy goats.  The teacher is the troll.  Tell children they can get across the bridge only if they know the password.  Choose a word with the long e or long o sounds, such as goat. Segment the word aloud.  The first child needs to blend the sounds correctly to guess the password and to pass over the bridge.  Repeat this procedure with other long vowel sounds

 

Conclusion:  After playing the game, the teacher will write all of the passwords on chart paper.  The class will read them together.  Students will select five of them to write sentences with and illustrate.

 

Assessment:

The sentences and illustrations will be assessed by the teacher. They will be shared with the class. Those having trouble with be given individual attention.  Early finishers can go to www.riverdeep.com to complete more activities on long vowel sounds.

 

Activities that Develop Independence:

This five-day lesson plan builds on one another.  Lesson 1 begins with direct instruction of blending.  Children, at the end of the lesson, will find words on their own that have the ee or ea pattern and add their leaf to the bulletin board.  Lesson 2 reviews ee and ea using homophones.  Children write their own riddles with homophones.  Lesson 3 allows children to guess the covered word and then work with a partner using their own words.  In Lesson 4, the child has to blend the words correctly to get across the make-believe bridge and then writes sentences on his/her own.  Finally, in Lesson 5, the child makes words according to the prompts given by the teacher, but makes the secret word with all of the letters.

 

Monitoring Student Progress:

Student observations will be done throughout the lessons.  Running records and student conferences will be ongoing.  Conference sheets will be kept for all students.

 

Modifications that Address Diverse Learners:

 

I will point to the letters, pictures, or cards and speak slowly.  Words will be repeated to help the diverse student.  A buddy system will be incorporated for the diverse learner.  Extra time will be given for the completion of assessments. 


 

Lesson Plan 5

 

Goals:

Same as Lesson 1

 

Objective-  The student will put letters together to make and sort words.

 

Prerequisites-  Knowledge of letter sounds

                          Knowledge of onsets and rimes

                          Knowledge of word families

  

Materials-  Student pocket strips

                    Pocket chart

                    Individual letters- a, a, e, m, n, p, r, t, t

                    Index cards with letters and words written on them       

 

Specific References to Course Readings:

The articles, “Phonemic Awareness Instruction”, “Everything You Wanted to Know About Phonics, but were Afraid to Ask”, “What We Know About How to Teach Phonics”, “Whole-to-Part Phonics Instruction; Building on What Children Knew to Help Them Know More” and “Alphabetics” all support the goals and instructions of this five -day lesson plan.  These articles all gave insights to the effective teaching of reading. Many of the strategies and approaches are built into my five-day lesson plan. All three styles of learning are incorporated into these lessons, auditory, kinesthetic and visual, therefore attempting to reach all children.  “Making Words lessons promote engagement because all children can be successful.” (What We Know About How to Teach Phonics, p. 100.)  These lessons are “hands-on-minds-on” activities. “Making Words includes even children with very limited literacy who enjoy manipulating the letters and making the words even if they do not get the larger words completely made until these words are made with the pocket chart letters.” (p. 101) These lessons will help children of all levels see how you can use the patterns you see in words to read and spell other words.  Also, “Whole to Part Phonics Instruction”, by Margaret Moustafa explains how you build on prior knowledge and go on.  Each one of these lessons builds on one another, therefore, transferring responsibility to the children.

 

Resources:

Houghton Mifflin Series

Phonics Library

www.eduplace.com

 

Lesson Overview:

           

Students will use individual letter cards to make words.  The teacher will tell students what letters to change to make words.  Students will have to guess the mystery word at the end of the lesson using all of the letters.

 

Lesson Procedure:

 

Introduction:  The teacher will introduce the lesson by reading the story, Mean Jean, Recess Queen, by Alexis O’Neill.  She will say, “Today we are going to make words by using individual letters and pocket strips at your desk.  At the end of the lesson, you will get to guess the mystery word using all of the letters.” 

Main Activity:  Each child will have letters a, a, e, m, n, p, r, t, t and pocket strips.  The same letters are displayed in the teacher’s pocket chart. The teacher will tell the students to take out three letters and make the word, ten.  Change those letters around and make a new word, net.  Change the n and make the word pet.  Change the p and make met.  Change the e and make mat.  Change the m and make rat.   The teacher will tell the students to keep these three letters and make tar.  Add a letter to make tarp.  With these letters make the word trap.  Change one letter and make tram.  I rode on a tram at Disneyworld.   Change one letter and make the word part.  Change the first letter and make the word tart.  Now take the ar out and find the letters to make the four-letter word tent.  Add a letter to make someone’s name, Trent.Ask if they used the capital letter on the back of the t card.  Take the t out and add two letters to make the word, parent.  Take the r out and find another letter to make the word, patentInventions have a patent on them so they are protected.  Take all letters out except for t, a, and e.  Add a letter to make the word, team.  Change one letter and make the word, mean.  After each word, the teacher will call on a child to make the word with the large letter cards in the pocket chart.  The teacher also has an index card with the word already written on it to put in the pocketchart after the student has correctly spelled the word with the letters.   Then the teacher will ask if anyone can figure out what word can be made with all nine letters.  The teacher will give students a hint that it is a type of shelter they studied in Social Studies.  Use all of the letters and make the word, apartment.  Students would then sort words for beginning sounds of  p and tr and rhyming words with at and et.

 

Conclusion:  The teacher will call on a child to sort the words with the index cards in the pocket chart.  All of the words would be read aloud with the class.   The teacher will ask, “Suppose you wanted to spell the word, stream. What word would help you to spell, stream?”  The students could then write a story about their parents taking them on vacation and wading in the stream. 

 

Assessment- I would assess the children as I walked around the room while they were making words.  I would take note of those having trouble and work with them individually.  When the students came to me for Self-selected reading, I would have them read Mean Jean, the Recess Queen by Alexis O’Neill, and I would complete a running record on each child.

 

Activities that Develop Independence:

This five-day lesson plan builds on one another.  Lesson 1 begins with direct instruction of blending.  Children, at the end of the lesson, will find words on their own that have the ee or ea pattern and add their leaf to the bulletin board.  Lesson 2 reviews ee and ea using homophones.  Children write their own riddles with homophones.  Lesson 3 allows children to guess the covered word and then work with a partner using their own words.  In Lesson 4, the child has to blend the words correctly to get across the make-believe bridge and then writes sentences on his/her own.  Finally, in Lesson 5, the child makes words according to the prompts given by the teacher, but makes the secret word with all of the letters.

 

Monitoring Student Progress:

Student observations will be done throughout the lessons.  Running records and student conferences will be ongoing.  Conference sheets will be kept for all students.

 

Modifications that Address Diverse Learners:

 

I will point to the letters, pictures, or cards and speak slowly.  Words will be repeated to help the diverse student.  A buddy system will be incorporated for the diverse learner.  Extra time will be given for the completion of assessments. 

 

Reflection

 

  1. How does this method of lesson planning differ from what you usually use or expected planning would be like?

 

When I plan for instruction, I use the SC standards for 2nd grade.  These are my goals.  Of course, I have objectives, but I usually do not write down prerequisites.  I make sure I have the materials, but I don’t write them down either.  This method of lesson plan is very thorough and requires you to plan for each child individually.  I am now more aware of planning for the diverse student.  I have always planned for writing, but this course has shown me how important writing is to reading and needs to be done with all children.  I feel better equipped to address my children’s learning needs.

 

  1. What would you expect to see in terms of student engagement and student outcomes after teaching this lesson? Why?

 

I feel that this lesson plan would engage all children and motivate them to learn.  Fun activities were planned so the students would enjoy learning the ee and  ea  sound.  I would expect my outcome to be that each child was successful in blending and reading ee and ea words.  To be effective, my instruction should teach children to notice, think about, and manipulate sounds in spoken language.  “Phonemic Awareness Instruction”.  Hopefully, my children would be as successful as I think they would.

     

  1. How does this lesson address the needs of the emergent reader?

 

This five-day lesson plan builds upon each other.  Each whole-to-part lesson begins with a read aloud or activity that gets more complex each day.  The emergent reader will benefit first from direct instruction and then go on to be independent.  Prior knowledge is a base from which to start each lesson.  “What We Know About How to Teach Phonics”  The emergent reader will feel self-confident and see the activities (making words, make-believe bridge, guess the covered word) as pleasurable and think that learning is fun.

 

  1. How does this lesson lead to independent use of phonemic awareness and phonics skills?

 

This lesson begins with direct instruction leading to independent use of skills.  All of the lessons lend themselves to independence.  In Lesson 1, students are finding ee and ea words on their own.  Students are writing their own riddles with homophones in Lesson 2.  Lesson 3 allows the student to guess the covered word, and the words have 2 or more syllables.  In Lesson 4, students are writing their own sentences.  The last lesson, which is “Making Words,” allows the student to figure out a secret word using all of their letters.  Words are sorted.  This lesson promotes engagement because all students can be successful.  This lesson is multilevel because it includes the use of longer words.  “What We Know About How to Teach Phonics”